Our Accomplishments

Quechua Benefit 1996-Present

 

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Don Julio Barreda asks if the alpaca breeders of the United States could help the people of Macusani, Peru. The first dental trip to Peru is organized by Mario Pedroza and Mike Safley. The team attends to 907 patients.

1996

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Quechua Benefit is incorporated as a 501(3) c non profit corporation.

1997

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The third annual dental trip sees 1,200 patients.

1998

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Quechua Benefit ships winter coats, shoes, sweaters, school supplies to Peru for 1,000 children.

1999

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The dental team expands to two dentists and the 4th annual trip serves three towns and 1801 patients.

2000

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The charity begins financial support of the Musqa Runa orphanage in Macusani.

2001

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Quechua Benefit delivers disaster relief in the form of blankets and antibiotics during one of the most devastating Andean freezes in decades.

2002

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A Quechua dentist volunteers for the 8th annual dental trip which saw a record 2,147 patients. Quechua Benefits begins supporting missions staffed entirely by Peruvians while continuing their tradition of campaigns staffed by international dentists.

2003

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A grant for the Flora Foundation of $10,000 per year for three years enables Quechua Benefit to hire a Peruvian Dentist to operate the mobile dental clinic. Quechua Benefit sees 4,200 patients.

2004

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Quechua Benefit begins year round dental services in 20 towns and sees 500 patients per month.

2005

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Quechua Benefit Raises $260,000 and begins supporting two more orphanages in addition to Sister Antonia’s soup kitchen in Yanque, which feeds 800 people per day.

2006

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Quechua Benefit provides disaster relief to earthquake victims in Ica.
Quechua Benefit registers as a Peruvian Non Profit and opens a small office in Arequipa.

2007

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The charity expands to service 40 communities in the Altiplano and sees their patient count top 36,000.
Quechua Benefit introduces International Children’s network to Peru. By 2016 they are sponsoring hundreds of the poorest children of Peru, supporting their education and helping their families.

2008

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Quechua Benefit begins building Casa Chapi, a children’s home that will become home to 100 children.
Quechua Benefit hosts Amigos from Pacific University from Forest Grove, Oregon to prescribe eyeglasses to more than 1,500 patients in Chivay, Peru.

2009

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The construction of the Snowmass Health Clinic, four residential casitas, kitchen, dining hall, two green houses, an animal building for chickens, rabbits and guinea pigs, garage, and workshop are completed.
Dental missions continue and the first annual international medical mission is conducted by 21 doctors, nurses, and translators who see 2,173 patients.

2010

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Casa Chapi opens with 20 children living onsite while going to school in Chivay and Yanque during the day.
A team of eye surgeons from Australia teams with Quechua Benefit to do cataract surgeries in the Colca Valley.

2011

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Casa Chapi becomes home to 41 children.

2012

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Casa Chapi is certified as a primary school for kids grade 1-6 by the Peruvian Ministry of Education, who further agrees to provide teachers, meals, and school supplies.

2013

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Construction begins on the new sports facility and soccer field.
51 children live and attend school at Casa Chapi. English as a second language is taught beginning in the first grade.
Quechua Benefit begins leading alpaca breed improvement programs in the Peruvian highlands, supplying fiber testing equipment, genetic improvement education, and marketing support.

2014

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Construction begins on a new four-room schoolhouse, chapel, casita for 12 more children, a central plaza, and administrative offices.
Casa Chapi goes green and becomes self-sufficient, installing a solar energy system and retiring the gas-operated generator permanently.
Quechua Benefit establishes the Allyima brand to market hand-spinning yarn in the USA and begins importing artesian products made by highland women in alpaca breeding communities. The goal of the Alliyma project is to make Quechua Benefit financially sustainable and provide jobs and training to women in the highlands.
Quechua Benefit initiates its partner school program in association with Cascades Academy in Bend, Oregon that will eventually grow to four schools in the USA or abroad.

2015

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The schoolhouse, casita, plaza and chapel are all completed. Wi-Fi is installed and available in the classrooms. 63 children now attend Casa Chapi. Construction begins on two additional classrooms. The staff at Casa Chapi grows to 21.
The Quechua Benefit medical team initiates it first ever preventative medicine campaign that attends to 6,000 people in seven towns and ten schools. This program delivers parasite medicine, anemia treatment, dental exams, dental fluoride treatments, eye exams, and eyeglasses.
Our first exchange student from Casa Chapi travels to the USA to finish her secondary education.

2016