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Choosing a Charity

Giving can do so much good. The more time you take to decide on your charity of choice the more good you will do. The following list of do’s and don’ts will surely make your charitable dollars go farther.

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Ichupampa Community Kitchen nears completion

We are happy to report that Ichupampa is rising from the rubble left by an earthquake in August 2016. Thanks to you, the Sister Antonia Memorial Kitchen in Ichupampa is nearing completion. The Quechua Benefit team was onsite last week, and the building will be up and running no later than March 15th.

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Video: The Chapel at Casa Chapi

Watch this new video to find out how Casa Chapi received its name, and how the Chapel at Casa Chapi came to be. The beautiful stained glass windows will take your breath away. Many of the local people who enter the chapel for the first time are immediately brought to tears. A production of Voice4Nations.

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The Quechua Benefit Ambassador Program: From Down Under to the Mountain Top (part two)

For the Corani EPD project to succeed in the dual goal of 1) increasing the price of the co-op’s fleece and 2) simultaneously improving the genetics of the member’s alpacas, it needed a micron measurement device. I consulted with Angus McColl of Yocom-McColl Testing Laboratories in Denver, Colorado, who recommended an OFDA 2000, manufactured by BSC Electronics of Australia.

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100% Solar Energy at Casa Chapi

Casa Chapi Children’s Village in the Colca Valley of southern Peru gets 100% of its energy from the sun. The Colca Valley gets about 330 days of sunshine a year. In October 2015, we installed a solar electric system to compliment the solar hot water heaters that were installed a few years before. These systems supply Casa Chapi with 100% of its energy needs, and we are proud that it’s entirely renewable!

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Genetic Change, Part Four: Generational Interval

Generation interval affects the rate of genetic change simply because the more rapidly one generation of improved alpacas replaces the previous one, the faster the gain. It is determined by the average age of 1) producing males and 2) females in a given herd. Alpacas have a generation interval of four to six years for females and approximately five years for males, although this interval will vary from herd to herd.

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